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2011 IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation
New Orleans, LA, USA
June 5-8, 2011

Accepted Workshops

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The following workshops have been accepted for CEC 2011:
  1. Human-like Bots
    organizer: Philip Hingston <p.hingston@ecu.edu.au>
    website: http://www.botprize.org/HumanlikeBotsWorkshop.html
    (description below)
    Note: This workshop will be held after the Human-like Bots competition, so that competitors can discuss their bots and results.

  2. Agent-Based Computational Economics and Finance
    organizers: Umberto Gostoli <u.gostoli@gmail.com>, Shu-Heng Chen <chen.shuheng@gmail.com>
    website: http://www.aiecon.org/conference/CEC_2011_ACE_CFP.html
    (description below)

  3. Evolutionary Music
    organizer: Francisco Fernandez de Vega <fcofdez@unex.es>
    website: http://www.dei.estg.ipleiria.pt/evolutionary-music/
    (description below)

  4. International Workshop on Distributed Evolutionary Computation in Informal Environments (DECIE 2011)
    organizers: JJ Merelo <jmerelo@geneura.ugr.es>, J.L.J. Laredo <juanlu@geneura.ugr.es>,
    organizers: Francisco Fernandez de Vega <fcofdez@unex.es>, Maribel García-Arenas <mgarenas@atc.ugr.es>
    website: http://geneura.ugr.es/~iwdecie
    (description below)

  5. Undergraduate Research Workshop
    organizer: Clare Bates Congdon <congdon@usm.maine.edu>
    website: http://www.cs.usm.maine.edu/~congdon/Conferences/CEC2011/UGR.html
    (description below)
Workshops will be held on Sunday, June 5, with the exception of the Human-like Bots Workshop.

Note that most workshops have early submission and acceptance dates so that participants can take advantage of the CEC early registration deadline of April 15th, although later submissions will be accepted when possible.

 

Workshop Descriptions

  1. Human-like Bots
    organizer: Philip Hingston <p.hingston@ecu.edu.au>

    Description: This workshop is about how bots for a computer game can be made to behave like human players. It is aligned with the CEC2011 Human-like Bots competition, in which competitors program a bot to play the FPS Unreal Tournament 2004 to make it behave like a human player, and human judges try to tell whether they are playing bots or humans. The task is the same as that for the annual BotPrize competition, which, in turn, is a version of the classic Turing Test (e.g., http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_test or http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/turing-test/.

    See the workshop website for more information: http://www.botprize.org/HumanlikeBotsWorkshop.html


  2. Agent-Based Computational Economics and Finance
    organizers: Umberto Gostoli <u.gostoli@gmail.com>, Shu-Heng Chen <chen.shuheng@gmail.com>

    Description: Agent-based Computational Economics and Finance (ACE) is the computational study of economies modeled as evolving systems of autonomous interacting agents. The development of ACE during the last two decades marked an important paradigm shift from the representative, rational agent approach towards a behavioral, agent-based approach. Under this new paradigm, the economic system is viewed as a complex adaptive system, whose aggregate dynamics is the result of decentralized interactions among boundedly rational and heterogeneous agents using rule-of-thumb strategies that co-evolve over time through learning. The inductive analysis of the macro regularities emerging from the micro-interactions is increasingly becoming a valuable alternative to the traditional methodology based on the deductive analysis of mathematical models. The ACE basic concern is both descriptive, focusing on the constructive explanation of emergent global behavior, and normative, focusing on mechanism design.

    In recent years substantial advances in modeling tools allowed researchers to model a wide variety of complex social, economic and financial phenomena, such as inductive learning, endogenous network formation and the open-ended co-evolution of individual behaviors and economic institutions. Parallelly, the number of issues being addressed by these researchers is rapidly expanding: applications of the ACE methodology range from modeling agent behavior in the stock market and supply chains to understanding consumer purchasing behavior, from understanding the fall of ancient civilizations to modeling the engagement of forces on the battlefield or at sea, and many others.

    See the workshop website for more information: http://www.aiecon.org/conference/CEC_2011_ACE_CFP.html


  3. Evolutionary Music
    organizer: Francisco Fernandez de Vega <fcofdez@unex.es>

    Description: Music provides a perfect area of research for Evolutionary Computation and New Orleans is the place where a Specific Workshop on the topic should be launched. A number of topics will be explored, such as: Generative Music Composition, Evolutionary Music Modeling, Rhythmic structure and Key analysis, Music Improvisation, Music information retrieval, Audio restoration, and many more. The workshop aims particularly at providing a place - both physical and virtual - where the research is not only shown but also performed. A CD will be compiled and distributed among the audience with the results published in the workshop.

    See the workshop website for more information: http://www.dei.estg.ipleiria.pt/evolutionary-music/


  4. International Workshop on Distributed Evolutionary Computation in Informal Environments (DECIE 2011)
    organizers: JJ Merelo <jmerelo@geneura.ugr.es>, J.L.J. Laredo <juanlu@geneura.ugr.es>
    organizers: Francisco Fernandez de Vega <fcofdez@unex.es>, Maribel García-Arenas <mgarenas@atc.ugr.es>

    Description: Informal computing includes ways of creating computing systems which are not fixed or bound to an organization, such as
    Using these (and similar) kinds of computing presents its own challenges, since neither the topology nor the availability of a particular node is known; computing nodes will have different performances and capabilities (and the connection to them will too) so that evolutionary computing paradigms will have to be adapted to them to take full advantage of the system without losing the essence of evolutionary algorithm. Thus, the main topics of the workshop will gravitate around (but will not be limited to) these issues:
    See the workshop website for more information: http://geneura.ugr.es/~iwdecie


  5. Undergraduate Research Workshop
    organizer: Clare Bates Congdon <congdon@usm.maine.edu>

    Description: This workshop provides a forum for undergraduate students to present their research in evolutionary computation. Presentations describe senior-level research projects, summer research projects, or exceptional course projects, usually supervised by a faculty mentor. This workshop allows undergraduate students to put a capstone on their undergraduate research activities, by presenting their work at an international conference. It also encourages them to meet and interact with each other early in the conference, forming connections to make the conference more approachable and enjoyable for them. Moreover, attendees in this workshop will be sharing and networking with teaching faculty, graduate school faculty and undergraduate students interested in pursuing advanced degrees. Overall, this workshop serves as the hub of educational activities at the CEC conference.

    See the workshop website for more information: http://www.cs.usm.maine.edu/~congdon/Conferences/CEC2011/UGR.html
 

Please contact the CEC 2011 Workshop Co-Chairs with questions:
(Workshop Call for Proposals online here)